"Not Afraid Of Slowing Down: Emotionally strong people aren’t in need of constant action and excitement. They don’t need to run around all day and keep moving in order to avoid their demons. They appreciate a slow moment because it brings them closer to what it feels like to do nothing but living, breathing. This is not to say that they don’t enjoy excitement in their lives, but they aren’t junkies and are more than happy to just go for a walk and smell the roses."

http://elitedaily.com/life/15-things-that-emotionally-strong-people-dont-do/

"…have you ever wondered why so little of the future promised in TED talks actually happens? So much potential and enthusiasm, and so little actual change. Are the ideas wrong? Or is the idea about what ideas can do all by themselves wrong?” 

Pinay caregiver Rose Fostanes WOWS X Factor Israel.

PHILIPPINES, REPRESENT! (^___^)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9gvyl-BJ1Y&list=PLHf3u_PzdWmQ7m8gbgE7b3NG-xCAliiKD&index=2

Of ALL of the official Nelson Mandela tributes, this one performance by 11-year-old Botlhale Boikanyo reminds us how GREAT POETS shape human history just as much as great leaders. 

The mini-poet blew away the judges of “South Africa’s Got Talent” over a year before Mandela died. Her delightful poem is way too good to stay hidden on the Internet, so press play, and if you like it, share it.

"I have cerebral palsy. I shake all the time," Maysoon Zayid announces at the beginning of this exhilarating, hilarious talk. "I’m like Shakira meets Muhammad Ali." With grace and wit, the Arab-American comedian takes us on a whistle-stop tour of her adventures as an actor, stand-up comic and philanthropist.

This is the first TED Talk I’ve watched for 2014. Most befitting! 

the-absolute-best-posts:

wonderous-world:

Artist by Carlos Vila

Have you ever seen a painting of an elephant? Probably. What about a picture of an elephant painting a painting of an elephant? No? Well meet Suda who lives in Maetaeng Elephant Park in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The park was created to provide a unique and safe environment where all elephants are treated well and are free of harm from poachers. In the early years, Suda along with other elephants would paint abstract brush strokes on paper, and slowly over time, they learned to produce two and three dimensional art. They have an incredible ability to trace back over their original brush stroke. Elephants have a keen memory and show that here by being able to repeat the same paintings and techniques.

Caption Source | Meet the Elephants |  Park Website

(via viankabogera)

Tags: elephants art

explore-blog:

Did you know that the word “scientist” was coined for reconstructionist Mary Somerville? That’s right, the first “scientist” was a woman.

explore-blog:

Did you know that the word “scientist” was coined for reconstructionist Mary Somerville? That’s right, the first “scientist” was a woman.

nevver:

Calvin and Hobbes

thekidwiththehat:

skulblakasaiyan:

detectivefalafel:

THAT GOT EMOTIONAL TOO QUICKLY

can my tombstone also say he was pretty old

R.I.P. L. DARLYMAN.
L. DARLYMAN

HIS NAME IS ELDERLY MAN

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via cantdo-a-backflip)

"Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that ‘my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.’"

— Isaac Asimov (via tartantambourine)

(via villageidiocy)


hello small feathered things i am a baby elephant it is nice to meet you may we shake noses?

hello small feathered things i am a baby elephant it is nice to meet you may we shake noses?

(Source: sansgod, via neonstorm)

Tags: elephants

utilitarianthings:

The Float Table is a matrix of “magnetized” wooden cubes that levitate with respect to one another. The repelling cubes are held in equilibrium by a system of tensile steel cables.

It’s classical physics applied to modern design. Each handcrafted table is precisely tuned to seem rigid and stable, yet a touch reveals the secret to Float’s dynamic character.

(Source: rockpaperrobot.com, via veryspecificthingtohate)

gabifresh:

Cute Friendship Between Boy & His Bulldog

omg

This dog wishes his dear boy will never grow up.

(Source: unusuallytypical, via veryspecificthingtohate)

Tags: dogs love

Now that this cute cow has caught your attention… Check out this TED Talk video on how cows can save the world, literally: http://www.ted.com/talks/allan_savory_how_to_green_the_world_s_deserts_and_reverse_climate_change.html

Now that this cute cow has caught your attention… Check out this TED Talk video on how cows can save the world, literally: http://www.ted.com/talks/allan_savory_how_to_green_the_world_s_deserts_and_reverse_climate_change.html

(Source: yayforcows, via cantdo-a-backflip)

thepeoplesrecord:

Justice for Jordan Davis: Another white killer using ‘Stand Your Ground’ to defend shooting a black teenage boyOctober 6, 2013
Florida has another chance to deliver justice to the parents of a slain black boy. The state that faced calls for boycott over the acquittal of George Zimmerman is currently holding pretrial hearings in a similar case.
Nearly a year ago in Jacksonville, Michael Dunn, a 45-year-old white gun collector and software engineer, fired at least eight shots into a carful of teenagers after admonishing them about the volume of their music. Two of those shots hit and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis, an African-American boy.
Dunn, who has two more pretrial hearings next month, is using the Stand Your Ground law in his defense; it’s the same one that Zimmerman, who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin, initially invoked before his trial and subsequent acquittal.
The law was originally crafted by the National Rifle Association and introduced to the  American Legislative Exchange Council, which pushed it as a “model bill” in states around the country. The Florida version of the law passed in 2005. Although the measure allows people to use deadly force if they feel threatened regardless of whether they can safely leave the scene, it provides no clear definition of what constitutes a threat.
What that essentially means is free rein for gun owners to carry their weapons into any situation, shoot and later claim to have felt threatened even in the case of killing someone. This Wild West mentality has proven advantageous for older white gun users like Dunn, who have a greater chance than others of proving homicide justifiable according to studies like  this one.
Dunn said he felt threatened when one of the car’s occupants brandished a shotgun. He fired shots from his 9 mm and then fled the scene. But police found no weapons in Davis’ car or in the surrounding area. Davis’ father, Ron, lamented, “They were just kids. … They have never been in trouble. The kids had no weapon; they had no drugs in the car.”
With killings like those of Martin and Davis causing public uproar, Congress has been compelled to look into Stand Your Ground laws. In fact, a Senate hearing on the laws would have taken place last week but was postponed due to the Washington Navy Yard shooting. The hearing had been slated to feature testimony from Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, and Davis’ mother Lucia McBath.
In lieu of the Senate hearing, McBath agreed to appear on “Uprising” for an interview. As a mother of two boys myself, I asked McBath to tell me about the child she had lost.
“Jordan was the life of the party,” she began. “He had lots and lots of friends. People seemed to gravitate toward him. He used to bring everybody together. I figured that when he became a man he would become a social organizer or activist or an attorney or would live out his life doing something bringing people together.”
There are differences between the shootings of Martin and Davis. In Davis’ case, there were plenty of witnesses to the shooting, and there was no physical contact between the shooter and the victim. However, as McBath points out, both involved “black young males, unarmed, being shot down.”
McBath believes the Stand Your Ground laws need to be closely examined. “You don’t have to prove you were threatened,” she noted. “The ludicrous thing about these laws is that you only have to prove that you believed you were being threatened.”
The combination of Stand Your Ground laws and pervasive societal stereotypes of black men seems to have extended the impunity previously reserved for cops, to would-be cops and vigilantes. Nation magazine journalist Mychal Denzel Smith, who has been covering the Davis case, told me just weeks after the killing last year, “I can’t imagine any scenario where Michael Dunn would have felt justified in using such deadly force against a group of white teenagers in the same situation. I just can’t fathom that.” He added that the Stand Your Ground laws are easy to invoke in a society where “the image that we have of black manhood and black teens is as ‘naturally violent.’ ”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Justice for Jordan Davis: Another white killer using ‘Stand Your Ground’ to defend shooting a black teenage boy
October 6, 2013

Florida has another chance to deliver justice to the parents of a slain black boy. The state that faced calls for boycott over the acquittal of George Zimmerman is currently holding pretrial hearings in a similar case.

Nearly a year ago in Jacksonville, Michael Dunn, a 45-year-old white gun collector and software engineer, fired at least eight shots into a carful of teenagers after admonishing them about the volume of their music. Two of those shots hit and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis, an African-American boy.

Dunn, who has two more pretrial hearings next month, is using the Stand Your Ground law in his defense; it’s the same one that Zimmerman, who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin, initially invoked before his trial and subsequent acquittal.

The law was originally crafted by the National Rifle Association and introduced to the  American Legislative Exchange Council, which pushed it as a “model bill” in states around the country. The Florida version of the law passed in 2005. Although the measure allows people to use deadly force if they feel threatened regardless of whether they can safely leave the scene, it provides no clear definition of what constitutes a threat.

What that essentially means is free rein for gun owners to carry their weapons into any situation, shoot and later claim to have felt threatened even in the case of killing someone. This Wild West mentality has proven advantageous for older white gun users like Dunn, who have a greater chance than others of proving homicide justifiable according to studies like  this one.

Dunn said he felt threatened when one of the car’s occupants brandished a shotgun. He fired shots from his 9 mm and then fled the scene. But police found no weapons in Davis’ car or in the surrounding area. Davis’ father, Ron, lamented, “They were just kids. … They have never been in trouble. The kids had no weapon; they had no drugs in the car.”

With killings like those of Martin and Davis causing public uproar, Congress has been compelled to look into Stand Your Ground laws. In fact, a Senate hearing on the laws would have taken place last week but was postponed due to the Washington Navy Yard shooting. The hearing had been slated to feature testimony from Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, and Davis’ mother Lucia McBath.

In lieu of the Senate hearing, McBath agreed to appear on “Uprising” for an interview. As a mother of two boys myself, I asked McBath to tell me about the child she had lost.

“Jordan was the life of the party,” she began. “He had lots and lots of friends. People seemed to gravitate toward him. He used to bring everybody together. I figured that when he became a man he would become a social organizer or activist or an attorney or would live out his life doing something bringing people together.”

There are differences between the shootings of Martin and Davis. In Davis’ case, there were plenty of witnesses to the shooting, and there was no physical contact between the shooter and the victim. However, as McBath points out, both involved “black young males, unarmed, being shot down.”

McBath believes the Stand Your Ground laws need to be closely examined. “You don’t have to prove you were threatened,” she noted. “The ludicrous thing about these laws is that you only have to prove that you believed you were being threatened.”

The combination of Stand Your Ground laws and pervasive societal stereotypes of black men seems to have extended the impunity previously reserved for cops, to would-be cops and vigilantes. Nation magazine journalist Mychal Denzel Smith, who has been covering the Davis case, told me just weeks after the killing last year, “I can’t imagine any scenario where Michael Dunn would have felt justified in using such deadly force against a group of white teenagers in the same situation. I just can’t fathom that.” He added that the Stand Your Ground laws are easy to invoke in a society where “the image that we have of black manhood and black teens is as ‘naturally violent.’ ”

Source

(via megafae)