thepeoplesrecord:

Justice for Jordan Davis: Another white killer using ‘Stand Your Ground’ to defend shooting a black teenage boyOctober 6, 2013
Florida has another chance to deliver justice to the parents of a slain black boy. The state that faced calls for boycott over the acquittal of George Zimmerman is currently holding pretrial hearings in a similar case.
Nearly a year ago in Jacksonville, Michael Dunn, a 45-year-old white gun collector and software engineer, fired at least eight shots into a carful of teenagers after admonishing them about the volume of their music. Two of those shots hit and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis, an African-American boy.
Dunn, who has two more pretrial hearings next month, is using the Stand Your Ground law in his defense; it’s the same one that Zimmerman, who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin, initially invoked before his trial and subsequent acquittal.
The law was originally crafted by the National Rifle Association and introduced to the  American Legislative Exchange Council, which pushed it as a “model bill” in states around the country. The Florida version of the law passed in 2005. Although the measure allows people to use deadly force if they feel threatened regardless of whether they can safely leave the scene, it provides no clear definition of what constitutes a threat.
What that essentially means is free rein for gun owners to carry their weapons into any situation, shoot and later claim to have felt threatened even in the case of killing someone. This Wild West mentality has proven advantageous for older white gun users like Dunn, who have a greater chance than others of proving homicide justifiable according to studies like  this one.
Dunn said he felt threatened when one of the car’s occupants brandished a shotgun. He fired shots from his 9 mm and then fled the scene. But police found no weapons in Davis’ car or in the surrounding area. Davis’ father, Ron, lamented, “They were just kids. … They have never been in trouble. The kids had no weapon; they had no drugs in the car.”
With killings like those of Martin and Davis causing public uproar, Congress has been compelled to look into Stand Your Ground laws. In fact, a Senate hearing on the laws would have taken place last week but was postponed due to the Washington Navy Yard shooting. The hearing had been slated to feature testimony from Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, and Davis’ mother Lucia McBath.
In lieu of the Senate hearing, McBath agreed to appear on “Uprising” for an interview. As a mother of two boys myself, I asked McBath to tell me about the child she had lost.
“Jordan was the life of the party,” she began. “He had lots and lots of friends. People seemed to gravitate toward him. He used to bring everybody together. I figured that when he became a man he would become a social organizer or activist or an attorney or would live out his life doing something bringing people together.”
There are differences between the shootings of Martin and Davis. In Davis’ case, there were plenty of witnesses to the shooting, and there was no physical contact between the shooter and the victim. However, as McBath points out, both involved “black young males, unarmed, being shot down.”
McBath believes the Stand Your Ground laws need to be closely examined. “You don’t have to prove you were threatened,” she noted. “The ludicrous thing about these laws is that you only have to prove that you believed you were being threatened.”
The combination of Stand Your Ground laws and pervasive societal stereotypes of black men seems to have extended the impunity previously reserved for cops, to would-be cops and vigilantes. Nation magazine journalist Mychal Denzel Smith, who has been covering the Davis case, told me just weeks after the killing last year, “I can’t imagine any scenario where Michael Dunn would have felt justified in using such deadly force against a group of white teenagers in the same situation. I just can’t fathom that.” He added that the Stand Your Ground laws are easy to invoke in a society where “the image that we have of black manhood and black teens is as ‘naturally violent.’ ”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Justice for Jordan Davis: Another white killer using ‘Stand Your Ground’ to defend shooting a black teenage boy
October 6, 2013

Florida has another chance to deliver justice to the parents of a slain black boy. The state that faced calls for boycott over the acquittal of George Zimmerman is currently holding pretrial hearings in a similar case.

Nearly a year ago in Jacksonville, Michael Dunn, a 45-year-old white gun collector and software engineer, fired at least eight shots into a carful of teenagers after admonishing them about the volume of their music. Two of those shots hit and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis, an African-American boy.

Dunn, who has two more pretrial hearings next month, is using the Stand Your Ground law in his defense; it’s the same one that Zimmerman, who shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin, initially invoked before his trial and subsequent acquittal.

The law was originally crafted by the National Rifle Association and introduced to the  American Legislative Exchange Council, which pushed it as a “model bill” in states around the country. The Florida version of the law passed in 2005. Although the measure allows people to use deadly force if they feel threatened regardless of whether they can safely leave the scene, it provides no clear definition of what constitutes a threat.

What that essentially means is free rein for gun owners to carry their weapons into any situation, shoot and later claim to have felt threatened even in the case of killing someone. This Wild West mentality has proven advantageous for older white gun users like Dunn, who have a greater chance than others of proving homicide justifiable according to studies like  this one.

Dunn said he felt threatened when one of the car’s occupants brandished a shotgun. He fired shots from his 9 mm and then fled the scene. But police found no weapons in Davis’ car or in the surrounding area. Davis’ father, Ron, lamented, “They were just kids. … They have never been in trouble. The kids had no weapon; they had no drugs in the car.”

With killings like those of Martin and Davis causing public uproar, Congress has been compelled to look into Stand Your Ground laws. In fact, a Senate hearing on the laws would have taken place last week but was postponed due to the Washington Navy Yard shooting. The hearing had been slated to feature testimony from Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, and Davis’ mother Lucia McBath.

In lieu of the Senate hearing, McBath agreed to appear on “Uprising” for an interview. As a mother of two boys myself, I asked McBath to tell me about the child she had lost.

“Jordan was the life of the party,” she began. “He had lots and lots of friends. People seemed to gravitate toward him. He used to bring everybody together. I figured that when he became a man he would become a social organizer or activist or an attorney or would live out his life doing something bringing people together.”

There are differences between the shootings of Martin and Davis. In Davis’ case, there were plenty of witnesses to the shooting, and there was no physical contact between the shooter and the victim. However, as McBath points out, both involved “black young males, unarmed, being shot down.”

McBath believes the Stand Your Ground laws need to be closely examined. “You don’t have to prove you were threatened,” she noted. “The ludicrous thing about these laws is that you only have to prove that you believed you were being threatened.”

The combination of Stand Your Ground laws and pervasive societal stereotypes of black men seems to have extended the impunity previously reserved for cops, to would-be cops and vigilantes. Nation magazine journalist Mychal Denzel Smith, who has been covering the Davis case, told me just weeks after the killing last year, “I can’t imagine any scenario where Michael Dunn would have felt justified in using such deadly force against a group of white teenagers in the same situation. I just can’t fathom that.” He added that the Stand Your Ground laws are easy to invoke in a society where “the image that we have of black manhood and black teens is as ‘naturally violent.’ ”

Source

(via megafae)

KONY 2012 (by invisiblechildreninc)

1. Sign the pledge to show your support.

2. Get the bracelet and action kit.

3. Sign up for TRI to donate a few dollars a month. 

and join our Army for Peace.

Above all, SHARE THIS MOVIE ONLINE. 

Find it all at KONY2012.COM

[IMPORTANT UPDATE] March 9, 2012:

It doesn’t seem that Invisible Children is an independent do-good save-the-children outfit. They are paving the way —with Kony, brutal as he is, as the bogeyman— for AFRICOM…

Hopefully more people will also do their own research and not be vulnerable to slick propaganda such as Invisible Children’s.

For example, readers can Google terms such as “Yoweri Museveni and Congo genocide,” “Museveni and Kony,” “Museveni and and Rwanda genocide,” “Museveni and Acholi genocide,” and “U.S. support for dictator Museveni.”

[Read Full Article]


Shohreh’s story: How Iran violated a top student’s rights

GENEVA, 28 September 2011 (BWNS) – Like many young people the world over, Shohreh Rowhani grew up with high hopes of a good university education.

 Shohreh Rowhani from Nowshahr, Iran, ranked among the top 1% of candidates in her university entrance exam. But she has been barred from higher education for being a Bahai. Here her story is reported on a Persian-language human rights website.

But now she has run up against a system which – while promising opportunity on the surface – is cruelly designed to block her and other young Iranians from ever getting a degree.

Ms. Rowhani is a Baha’i, and her experience is made all the more unjust by the fact that she is among Iran’s most gifted students; she ranked 151 in the country after passing the national university exam in her chosen field of languages. In other words, her result put her among the top 1% of candidates who took the exam.

Buoyed by her impressive grades, Ms. Rowhani – who comes from the northern Iranian city of Nowshahr – began the online process of selecting her courses. But when the results of those applications were listed, she discovered that her submission had been rejected as an “incomplete file.”

It is a phrase well known to young Baha’is. For several years now, the term has appeared frequently as one among several ruses crafted to prevent them from actually matriculating even if they pass the national university exams.

Undeterred, Ms. Rowhani courageously went to the regional office that oversees the examination process and asked officials to explain what was wrong.

"They told me that this has happened because you are a Baha’i," she reported in a letter recently sent to several human rights organizations.

"Since you are a Baha’i you do not have the right to enter university," she was told.

She decided to take her case to the next level, managing to get a meeting with the head of the admissions department.

When confronted, this official simply “expressed his regret for this matter and told me that there is nothing he can do,” said Ms. Rowhani. “He said there is no way out of this and even if you enter university you would be expelled after three or four terms.”

She asked him if the results would have been different if she had said she was a Muslim.

"He said it makes no difference, as they know you," she wrote. “‘The ministry of intelligence has identified your family and all of the Baha’is already.’"

"They told me that I will not get any result, no matter who I might refer to," she said.

The experience of Shohreh Rowhani is also a familiar story for thousands of Baha’is in Iran who are barred from higher education on religious grounds.

Even for the fortunate ones who might be offered a place, expulsion often follows during the course of their studies. In recent months, two students at the Isfahan University of Technology were prevented from registering for the next term, also for having “incomplete documents;” a Baha’i studying English literature was thrown out of the University of Kerman; a biomedical engineering student at the University of Sahand was dismissed; and a physics student at the University of Mazandaran was expelled after completing eight semesters on the honor roll and gaining admission to a Master’s program.


Three decades of exclusion

All kinds of methods have been used by Iran since the 1979 Islamic Revolution to prevent Baha’is from attending university – firstly, by expelling them all, and then, imposing an outright ban on their accessing higher education.

In response to international condemnation, the Iranian government changed the rules in 2003, declaring that Baha’is could now take the examination. But when nearly a thousand Baha’is moved ahead in good faith, they encountered new barriers.

At first, exams were returned with “Islam” written in the religious affiliation slot – something unacceptable to Baha’is, who are taught by their faith to tell the truth at all times, especially about their religious beliefs.

So the government indicated that the word “Islam” referred only to the particular sub-test on religion that each applicant is required to take, allowing Baha’is in good conscience to apply for higher schooling. Then, in the mid-2000s, a number of Baha’is successfully entered various universities around the country – only to find that they were then often expelled soon after matriculation.

In March 2007, for example, the Reuters news agency reported that some 70 Baha’i students had been expelled that academic year from universities in Iran. In that report, an anonymous spokesperson for the Iranian Mission to the United Nations was quoted as saying in reply: “No one in Iran because of their religion has been expelled from studying.”

After another international outcry, Iran changed tactics again. Baha’is who took the exam began to find their results were simply being withheld. When they went to the national website to find out their scores, many received the message that they had “incomplete files” – leaving them in a bureaucratic limbo.


"Unjust and oppressive practices"

In an open letter sent last month to Iran’s minister for higher education, the Baha’i International Community called for an end to the “unjust and oppressive practices” that bar Baha’is and other young Iranians from university.

The letter also addressed the government’s crackdown on the Baha’i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE), an informal community initiative run by Baha’is to educate their youth who are barred from university. In May, government agents raided the homes of more than 30 individuals associated with the BIHE and arrested 14 of them. Seven educators have this week appeared in court. Dozens more, including students, have been called in for interrogation – all in an effort to close the project down.

"Such actions, as you know, have been conducted as a matter of official government policy and as part of a systematic campaign to eliminate the Baha’i community as a viable entity in your country," said the open letter, addressed to Kamran Daneshjoo, the Minister of Science, Research, and Technology. Read the open letter here: <http://news.bahai.org/story/848>

For Shohreh Rowhani and her co-religionists, the fight for their right to education continues.

In her letter to human rights organizations she has expressed her desire that everyone should “know how senselessly my rights have been violated.”

http://news.bahai.org/story/853

NEW YORK, 26 September 2011 (BWNS) – As a number of Baha’i educators appear in court in Iran, two Nobel Peace Prize winners have sharply criticized the Iranian government, comparing its actions to “the Dark Ages of Europe” or the “Spanish Inquisition.”

The remarks by Desmond Tutu, the Anglican Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, and Jose Ramos-Horta, President of East Timor, appear in an open letter to the academic community published today in the “Huffington Post,” under the title ‘Iran’s war against knowledge.’

In the letter, the Nobel laureates call upon the Iranian government to release unconditionally and drop charges against the seven Baha’is currently on trial in Iran for their educational activities.

"The forward progress of humankind in the last centuries has been fueled, more than any other factor, by increasing access to information, more rapid exchange of ideas, and in most parts of the world, universal education," they write.

"So it is particularly shocking when despots and dictators in the twenty first century attempt to subjugate their own populations by attempting to deny education or information to their people.

"Not only is it futile in the long term, it makes them appear fearful of the very age they live in, and haunted by the new thinkers in their midst."

"Perhaps the most glaring example of this fear today is the denial of higher education to the members of the Baha’i Faith in Iran – a peaceful religion with no political agenda, which recognizes the unity of all religions," says the letter.


Court appearances

The publication of the open letter has coincided with reports that trials have now begun in Iran for seven Baha’i educators. They were detained in connection with an informal community initiative known as the Baha’i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE), which gave Baha’i professors – debarred by the Iranian government from practicing their professions – the opportunity to teach young community members who are themselves banned from university.

"Those arrested were neither political nor religious leaders," observe Archbishop Tutu and President Ramos-Horta in their letter. "They were lecturers in subjects that included accounting and dentistry, who today face the prospect of decades in prison. The crime with which they are charged – delivering higher education to Baha’i youth."

The Baha’i International Community has learned that six of the seven – detained after raids last May on some 39 homes of Baha’is associated with BIHE – are now being tried in pairs.

"The lawyer who was preparing to defend them is himself now in prison; two of the prisoners reportedly had court hearings yesterday; two appeared today and two tomorrow – and it seems that another was in court last week," said Bani Dugal, Principal Representative of the Baha’i International Community to the United Nations.

"All the signs are that we cannot expect a fair trial," she added.

Ms. Dugal expressed the gratitude of the Baha’i International Community to Archbishop Tutu and President Ramos-Horta.

"We thank them – as well as all the governments, organizations and people of goodwill throughout the world whose efforts send a clear message to the Iranian authorities that their actions are being closely watched and condemned," she said.


Expelled for their beliefs

The open letter also highlights the plight of other Iranian youth who have been expelled from universities “for their beliefs or for holding viewpoints determined to be counter to the ruling party, including pro-reform views.”

"We believe it is important to recognize that these actions are neither the result of or dictated by the Islamic faith. One need only look at the Dark Ages of Europe or the Spanish Inquisition to see that Iranian Ayatollahs are certainly not the first to use religion as the cloak to attempt to forcibly suppress ideas and knowledge that they fear could threaten their power. The rich philosophical and artistic Iranian traditions, the contributions of Iranian scholars worldwide, and the actions of the Muslim community members who have aided and supported the BIHE, are testament to the fact that the actions of their leaders are no reflection of the Muslim faith or the many good-willed Muslims in Iranian communities," the letter says.

"And while we believe that both historically and in today’s ‘wired’ world it is futile to suppress the quest for knowledge, there are many in Iran whose lives are being threatened or damaged by the attempt.

"They need our support."

Among other demands, the Nobel laureates are urging the academic community to register with their Iranian counterparts their disagreement with, and disapproval of, any policy which bars individuals from higher education based on their religious background or political persuasion.


Worldwide condemnation

The international outcry at Iran’s persecution of Baha’i educators has spanned the world in the past four months, from Australia to Zambia.

On 5 September, Baroness Catherine Ashton – High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs – expressed her “serious concern” about the attack on BIHE.

Three days earlier, Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird said the arrests of BIHE staff  ”are based on unfounded charges of conspiring against national security. This institute provides valuable educational services to the Baha’i community, which is denied formal higher education in Iran.”

The seven Baha’i educators facing trial are: Vahid Mahmoudi and Kamran Mortezaie, who reportedly appeared in court yesterday; Mahmoud Badavam and Nooshin Khadem, who were scheduled to appear today; and Ramin Zibaie and Riaz Sobhani, who will appear tomorrow. It is understood that Farhad Sedghi appeared in court on Tuesday 20 September.

Rainn Wilson BIHE Video Appeal by Education Under Fire.

The Baha’i’s in Iran, the country’s largest religious minority, have been persecuted since the 1979 revolution. Thousands were arrested and hundreds executed. Today, over 100 Baha’i’s are unjustly imprisoned including seven former community leaders and a number of educationalists. Iranian Baha’i’s are barred from university and even prevented from holding their own higher educational classes.

Young students in the UK share their views on their own education and their thoughts on this outrage

For more information on how you can support access to education for all in Iran visit:

http://www.Can-You-Solve-This.org

 
Happy Peace Day, Y’all! 
CrazyHappy Tiger Greetings, dear Humans! ◕‿◕
Please support our ItsOneHumanity project. SIGN UP now &amp; Spread the Love! http://itsonehumanity.org/video/global-truce-2012-intro-film
Danke schön!!! (๑ˆωˆ๑)ノ゙ 

Happy Peace Day, Y’all! 

CrazyHappy Tiger Greetings, dear Humans! 

Please support our ItsOneHumanity project. SIGN UP now & Spread the Love! http://itsonehumanity.org/video/global-truce-2012-intro-film

Danke schön!!! (ˆωˆ)ノ゙ 

(via chvnelno5)

GENEVA, 16 September 2011 (BWNS) – As a number of Baha’is in Iran await trial for providing higher education to youth barred from university, the Baha’i International Community has been distressed to learn of the arrest of a lawyer who was preparing to defend them.

Abdolfattah Soltani – a senior member of the legal team representing the prisoners – was arrested last Saturday. Mr. Soltani was a co-founder of the Defenders of Human Rights Center along with four other lawyers including Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Shirin Ebadi. The Tehran-based Center was shut down in a police raid in December 2008.

An Amnesty International appeal calling upon Iran to release Mr. Soltani immediately has described him as “one of the bravest human rights defenders in Iran…” 

"One by one courageous Iranian lawyers are being summoned and then arrested, or have to flee their homeland," observed Diane Ala’i, representative of the Baha’i International Community to the United Nations in Geneva.

"We are deeply concerned at the detention of Mr. Soltani," she said. "What precisely are the motives of the Iranian authorities for this arrest, just before his clients are expected to face trial?"

Seven Baha’is are still in prison in connection with their involvement in an informal educational program in which Baha’i professors – debarred by the Iranian government from practicing their professions – voluntarily offer their services to teach young community members who are banned from higher education.

Press reports in Iran have recently announced that the program – known as the Baha’i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE) – has been declared illegal.

Iranian authorities carried out raids three months ago on some 39 homes of administrators, staff and students of BIHE. The seven still detained are Mahmoud Badavam, Nooshin Khadem, Vahid Mahmoudi, Kamran Mortezaie, Farhad Sedghi and Ramin Zibaie – all arrested 22 May; and Riaz Sobhani – arrested 14 June.

"Many people associated with the Baha’i Institute for Higher Education have been arrested and interrogated," said Diane Ala’i. "Some have been imprisoned and then released. In addition to the seven who remain in prison, four others connected with BIHE were detained earlier this week."

Details of any imminent legal proceedings have been hard to establish, she said.

"We have received no formal report of the charges leveled against them, other than an indication that the accusations are once again related to matters of national security. Despite their best efforts, the lawyers have only been able to meet with three of the currently detained Baha’is."

"We call upon governments, organizations and people of good will everywhere to do whatever they can to dissuade Iran from perpetrating yet another appalling miscarriage of justice," said Ms. Ala’i.

"JUST BE. BE JUST. JUST. BE." &#8212; Drei ze D♀rk L♂rd 

"JUST BE. BE JUST. JUST. BE." 
— Drei ze D♀rk L♂rd 

(via -thebadguy)

Dr.Burzynski’s outstanding resilience has won an epic battle not just for cancer patients, their loved ones and his own genius; but also for those scientists who came before him but were successfully destroyed by the FDA like Dr.Royal Raymond Rife, the great scientist who also succeeded in finding a cure for cancer.

Dr.Burzyski, thank you for never giving up on fighting for truth and justice. You are a living hero to humankind! Even Nikola Tesla would be proud of you!

“Let the future tell the truth, and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine.”Nikola Tesla

         Sung-bong Choi. The awesomeness of his talent shared with true humility is both inspiring and heartbreaking. His life is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit. He is a Prime Mover in its truest sense. Rarely have I been moved with such depth of mixed emotions by any man’s presence… Listening to him sing evokes pain, beauty, hope, love…all at the same time. I sincerely pray I can meet him someday.

         On this plane of existence, there are many injustices that the human mind cannot fathom. Among these are the heart-rending trials of innocent children. I know there are many studies in sociology and psychology that assert how a child’s past can determine his or her adult behaviour.

         Some people observe that notably, those born to loving parents, are seemingly favoured by God, while those born to abusing and rejecting parents are destined to endure a lifetime of suffering, since children, growing up in such a destructive atmosphere are more likely as adults, to perpetrate abuse on their own children, thus repeating the cycle of violence.

         However, I personally know more than a handful of individuals who were not blessed with loving parents and peaceful homes; and yet by choice, they have grown into the most dedicated and loving people I know. That is the beauty of free will.

         What makes human life unique is the scale of our choice, the degree to which we are free to choose to act for good or evil, to help or to harm. From the Buddhist standpoint, we always have the option of choosing to create value from even the most traumatic or difficult situation. It is through such choices we can fulfill our unique mission and our self-determined purpose in life. Though this process of self-perfection, we manifest the fullest expression to the inherent treasure of our human dignity. The widespread awakening to the human dignity that dwells within each and every one of us is a critical foundation to implementing human rights. 

         When I was younger, I was tormented by the injustices suffered by many innocent children. My perception of the fate of children and their oppressors, to a certain extent, almost left me jaded. But after a decade, I have found my own path to peace and security, not just for myself, but for humanity as a whole. While I was intensively trained and educated as a journalist, I have finally decided to focus on education - instead of pursuing it as a hobby. While I was still studying in university, I taught special children and street children through theatre and creative storytelling in my free time. This is my chosen path of service as a follower of Baha’i Faith. Being a full-time teacher now still gives me time to research, write and contribute articles; but more importantly, it gives me the sense of peace that I am able to constantly commune with young children; and contribute to both their spiritual and material progress.

         In a way, I am a cool mother to a hundred children and that in itself makes me learn so much from them. :) In my quest for a holistic approach towards education, I also became a licensed financial adviser more than two years ago so I can professionally educate parents and children about financial literacy. All in all, what matters to me is that as a teacher, I get to cultivate talent and creativity in young children. I believe that more than plain knowledge, nurturing talent, creativity & spirituality in children can help them shatter man-made limitations, and will thus eventually help change the status quo. 

         With respect to countless individuals all over the world who have also suffered different kinds of child abuse, I believe that only God is able to know the true state of any soul. It is of no help to fear that such children will grow up as abusive adults themselves. What we need to encourage is for all people to hone and share their allotted talents, whatever their past.

         God in His bounty has endowed every created thing, however humble, “with the capacity to exercise a particular influence, and been made to possess a distinct virtue”. Reminiscent of the parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30), Bahá’u’lláh, in the “Gleanings”, (p. 149) draws attention to the need to make efforts to develop and demonstrate in action our God-given potential:  

…All that which ye potentially possess can, however, be manifested only as a result of your own volition. Your own acts testify to this truth.

         Is it not an evidence of the justice of God that each of us, irrespective of family background, is assessed in terms of the efforts we have personally made to seize whatever opportunities existed in our lives, to develop and use our given talent, be it large or small?

         The sublime dignity of all human beings lies not in the perception of others what an individual is worth based on his or her background and accomplishments. Human dignity is a given reality, intrinsic to the human substance, and not contingent upon any functional capacities which always vary in degree.

         And Sung-bong, at such a young age, has evidently polished - against all odds - what is truly noble and sublime, latent in all human beings. It is my fervent prayer that his voice reaches more hearts all throughout Asia and beyond.


Love and Light,

Drei ze Dork Lord.

Tesla - EDISON’S MEDICINE


You’re guilty of crime in the first degree,
Second and third as well.
My jury finds you’ll be serving your time
When you go straight to hell.

'Cause he was Lord of the Lightning,
Though “socially fright’ning”,
But never out to sell.

Their nickels and pence
Meant more than did sense,
And not the sensible thing.

Nor did the man outta time, man outta time.
Thought you was crazy. You was one of a kind.
Man outta time, man outta time.
All along, world was wrong. You was right.

All that he saw, all he conceived,
They just could not believe.
Steinmetz and Twain were friends that remained,
Along with number three.
He was electromagnetic, completely kinetic,
"New Wizard of the West."
But they swindled and whined that he wasn’t our kind,
And said Edison knew best.

He was the man outta time, man outta time.
Thought you was crazy. You was one of a kind.
Man outta time, man outta time.
Said you was outta your mind!

You took a shot and it did you in.
Edison’s medicine.
You played your cards, but you couldn’t win.
Edison’s medicine.

I spent twelve years of hard time,
More like the best years of my life.
Never heard or read a single word
About “the man” and his “wicked mind.”
They’ll sell you on Marconi.
Familiar, but a phony.
Story goes they sold their souls
And swore that you’d never know…

About the man outta time, man outta time.
Thought you was crazy. You was one of a kind.
Man outta time, man outta time.
Swore you was outta your mind!

You took a shot and it did you in.
Edison’s medicine.
You played your cards, but you couldn’t win.
Edison’s medicine.

"O Son of Spirit! The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice; turn not away therefrom if thou desirest Me, and neglect it not that I may confide in thee. By its aid thou shalt see with thine own eyes and not through the eyes of others, and shalt know of thine own knowledge and not through the knowledge of thy neighbor. Ponder this in thy heart; how it behooveth thee to be. Verily justice is My gift to thee and the sign of My loving-kindness. Set it then before thine eyes. — Hidden Words, Arabic #2"

Injustice Against Baha’is is Injustice Against Iranians

Please do read the linked blog by Christopher Schwartz: http://schwartztronica.wordpress.com/2010/08/11/injustice-against-bahais-is-injustice-against-all-iranians/#comment-839